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A quick and easy way to organize those spices for your next adventure. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  What you will need:

You can go to your local $1 Store and pick up all these items. 

The first step was to use the labels to cover up the days of the week. Purchase labels that are the same width of the compartments and then you will have to trim them to fit. 

 

When it's done… they look like this.

              

Water Proofing:

             

Choose your favorite spices, label them and your ready for your next adventure. 

 

 

 

Photo Credit : Miss Tweedle

 

 

What's the difference between Freeze-Dried and Dehydrated Food? 

A lot of people use the terms dehydrated and freeze-dried like they are the same thing. However, there are some major differences between dehydrated and freeze-dried food storage. 

The Dehydration Process 

With any type of food preservation, moisture needs to be removed from the food. The most common way to do this is by dehydrating.

Dehydrating has been a food preservation practice for thousands of years, dating back to at least 12,000 BC.[1] The Romans and Middle Easterners would dry fruits and vegetables in “still houses” which would use a fire to dry out and smoke foods.

Modern day dehydration isn’t that complex. Machines, like a SnackMaster Dehydrator, circulate hot and dry air across the food. This removes much of the water. The moist air is then dried so that water continues to be removed. The temperatures are high enough to remove water but not high enough to cook the food. Dehydrated food is usually withered and harder.

The Freeze-Drying Process


The freeze-drying process is a relatively modern preservation process. Freeze-drying isn’t something you can do at home without high-tech machinery.

Some reports show that freeze drying originated with the Inca Empire.[2] However, reliable sources of freeze-drying were created during World War II as a way to preserve blood plasma, medicine and later, food for the troops.

Freeze Drying is a fairly simple process too. The food is placed on large racks inside of a vacuum chamber. The temperature is lowered to below freezing and then raised rapidly to above boiling. The process is so fast that it removes the moisture from the food without destroying the structure.

The Main Differences
Moisture Content. The main objective with food preservation is to remove the moisture so that the food doesn’t decompose, grow mold, etc. Dehydration removes about 90-95 percent of the moisture content[3] while freeze drying removes about 98-99 percent.[4] Foods that you dehydrate at your home will typically have a 10 percent moisture content level while foods that are dehydrated professionally will have a lower moisture content – which increases the shelf life.

Shelf Life. The moisture removal has a direct impact on the shelf life. Most dehydrated products like dried fruits, vegetables, powders and TVP; have a shelf life of about 15-20 years. However, dehydrated items like honey, salt, sugar, hard wheats and oats have a 30-year shelf life – sometimes longer.[5] Freeze-dried foods will have a longer average shelf life. Freeze-dried fruits, vegetables, just-add-water meals and real meats will have a 25-30-year shelf life.[6] Ideally, all of your food storage would be stored at a temperature of 60 degrees or lower.

Nutritional Content. According to research by the American Institute for Cancer Research[7], freeze-dried foods retain the vast majority of the vitamins and minerals found in the original food. However, when compared to fresh fruits and vegetables, freeze-dried foods did lack in some vitamins – like Vitamin C – which break down very rapidly.

Dehydration doesn’t change the fiber or iron content of food. However, dehydration can break down vitamins and minerals during the preservation process and retain less of their nutritional value when compared to freeze-dried food. Dehydration tends to result in the loss of Vitamins A and C, thiamine, riboflavin and niacin.[8]

Appearance & Composition. One of the main differences between dehydrated and freeze-dried food is how they look. Most people are familiar with banana chips (dehydrated) but not necessarily freeze-dried bananas (which become soft when you place them in your mouth). Weight is another difference. Freeze-dried foods are going to weigh a lot less than dehydrated foods. This makes them easier to haul or store.

Cooking. Dehydrated foods will require cooking. Many times, they will also require some type of seasoning. This means that you’ll need to spend time boiling the product in hot water and letting it cook. The preparation time for dehydrated products can take anywhere from 15 minutes to 4 hours depending. However, with freeze-dried foods, you just need to add water. Adding either hot water or cold water will get the job done depending on what you’re eating. Freeze-dried foods will usually be ready to eat in less than 5 minutes.

Hungry Hikers Food is made primarily with Freeze Dried Food. We believe that it maintains the integrity and nutritional structor of the food. And we just think it taste a whole lot better.

Cheers-

Your Hungry Hiker Crew

 

Would you like to camp, but don’t know what to pack or where to start? Have you tried camping, but not enjoyed the experience? It’s not too late to plan a camping trip this year and start preparing for next!

We camp with our children nearly every summer. We love to camp, but we are also drawn to the affordability of a camping holiday. After a few rough trips and 11 years of trial and error, I’m super happy with my camping kitchen. It’s very thorough, yet doesn’t take up too much space. We’ve camped with up to six people and I’ve prepared countless yummy meals with the items in the list here, so I wanted to share my tips on how to pack the perfect camping kitchen!

How to Pack the Perfect Kitchen Supply List

Skillet – I prefer cast-iron as it does well on a stove or over the campfire.
Stockpot or Sauce Pan with Lid (4 litres)
Griddle
Stove-top Toaster
Coffee Pot and/or Kettle and/or French Press
Large Serving/Cooking Spoons
Ladle
Metal Spatula
Tongs
Roasting Sticks – most areas do not allow you to cut your own
Cheese Grater
Can Opener
Cutting Board
Kitchen Knife(s) with Covers
Kitchen Scissors
Bottle Opener
Wine Bottle Opener
Measuring/Mixing Bowl (8 cup)
Measuring Cup (1 cup)
Measuring Spoons
Toothpicks
Salt & Pepper Shakers with Lids
Large Water Jug with Spigot (20 litres)
Dishes (Plates, Soup Bowls, Mugs)
Cutlery (Knives, Forks, Spoons)
Dish Pan
Dish Cloths – one per two days
Dish Towels – one per day
Pot Holders
Dish Soap
Pot Scrubber
Zipper Storage Sandwich Baggies – for packing lunches and snacks for outings
Tinfoil
Paper Towels
Plastic Food Storage Containers – for leftovers
Vinyl Tablecloth
Tablecloth Clips
Camping Stove – Fire bans often prevent cooking over an open fire; it’s also tricky to cook well over a fire.
Fuel for the Camping Stove
Matches and/or BBQ Lighter
Bin(s) or Drawers – for storing your kitchen (I use a 3-drawer system)

Tips for Your Camping Kitchen

-It’s possible to camp with a less equipped kitchen, but plan your meals and work through them in your head to ensure you have the equipment you will need to prepare them.
-It’s handy to have your camping kitchen always packed and ready to go – you don’t have to have a separate set of everything just for camping, but it’s convenient.
-Garage sales and second-hand stores are great places to pick up many of the above items, or ask parents and grandparents if they have extras of anything they’d like to get rid of.
-If you’re not sure if camping is your thing, ask to borrow the bigger ticket items from friends so you can give it a try before you invest a lot of money.
-Wipe down the table, wash the dishes and put everything away before leaving the campsite, or going to bed – otherwise you’ll attract insects and unwelcome critters.

-Go to www.hungryhikers.com and purchase some amazing meals. Perfect for when you first arrive and setting up. Easy and delicious.
-Plan all your meals in advance, write down all the ingredients you will need to prepare the meals and make a detailed packing list. Take your meal plan with you so you don’t forget.

Have fun and don't forget your Hungry Hikers Meals! 

This article is not sponsored. Any resources listed are for informational purposes only and are not intended as a review.

-Jenni

Guess who's turning 3 yrs old today... that's right Hungry Hikers! We appreciate the support we've received from each of you, our valued customers and as a way to say 'thanks', use HH2014 when ordering your meals during our Birthday Month (April) and you'll receive a 5% discount. 

We look forward to celebrating many more birthdays with all of you!
 

Hello Hungry Hikers. We are so excited to be back online and getting people excited for the 2014 season. We have traveled all over the world getting inspired and spreading the good news of Hungry Hikers. 

Let's start with what to pack in your kitchen spice kit. 

The Trail Trinity…

Cooking on the trail can be both amazing and frustrating. Amazing when you get off from a long day of pushing yourself to get to that perfect clearing, set up camp and begin to cook your meal. You are at once transported to another world with rich smells of exotic places and hot cooked delicious food you can’t wait to put in your mouth. It can also be frustrating if you find yourself at that perfect clearing and you begin to cook your meal and all you have to add to it is water.

Let me share with you the trinity of spices that every cook kit should have right next to the basics.

Curry- It warms the belly and feeds the soul. The smell and richness, it adds to just about anything and can spice up the meals you bring on your trip. If you're one that says “I hate curry, it’s too spicy” I encourage you to try your basic grocery store curry bottle. It adds flavor, not heat... that’s a whole other topic to talk about later.

Tarragon- Ahhh my favorite spice. Tarragon is a great addition both to your camping cook kit and for your home. It adds a subtle sweetness and can be paired with just about anything you would add basil or thyme to. Try it in soups, tuna, red sauces, creamy sauces heck.. just try it.

Smoked Paprika- Now if the first thing you think about is that red stuff that you see when you sit down at Grandma’s house and it’s covering those delicious mashed potatoes or those yummy deviled eggs and you have no idea what it is… this is not that. Smoked Paprika is a rich, smoky and fragrant spice that will add a pinch of exotic to any trail meal you bring. People will be pawning all over you for your “secret ingredient”.

 

 

Backpacker Magazine Fall Gear Guide

 

Backpacker Magazine Fall Gear Guide

We appreciate it when professionals in the field take the time to eat and then write about our food. It makes us even more hardened that we are on the right path with our passion to get good, delicious food out to those who need it. We are busy this winter in the kitchen with our creative hats on coming up with new meals to tempt your palette for 2013. We are hoping to stretch our culinary menu to include some pasta, couscous, and lentils.  

We like to toot our own horn and for those who did not see the comments that were written about our Three Sisters Scramble and our Chicken Pot Pie~ here they are!

From Backpacker Magazine Fall Gear Guide:

Hungry Hikers Three Sisters Scramble
Packed with sausage, potatoes, onions, and cheese, this double-serving, egg-based scramble is hearty enough as a meal on its own, but also works well as a protein-packed bagel or tortilla topper. “Fresh from the kitchen” is how one tester described the texture of the sausage and eggs, adding, “let it rehydrate for a few minutes longer than the recommended four minutes to avoid dry, spongy-textured potatoes.” 

Hungry Hikers Chicken Pot Pie
With a buttery mashed potato base, real chunks of chicken, and a medley of veggies that rehydrated to their original texture, this meal was a winner with testers. “It tastes like real food—it’s in a totally different league than other pre-packaged pot pies,” says one. To soften the veggies and meat and fully thicken the gravy requires at least 10 minutes of simmer time; pack sufficient fuel.

The Three Sisters are located in the Cascade Range in Central Oregon. The Three Sisters (North Sister at 10,085 feet, Middle Sister at 10,047 feet, and South Sister at 10,358 feet) are found in the eastern portion of the Wilderness. There are 14 glaciers offering one of the best examples of the effects of glaciation in the Pacific Northwest. Collier Glacier, between North and Middle Sister, is the largest glacier in Oregon. The South and Middle Sisters are not technically difficult climbs, but the North requires technical expertise and equipment. One of my mom's claims to fame is a summit of the South Sister.   

People with a knack for history know that The Sisters were named Faith, Hope and Charity by early settlers and that the Bachelor is near by. I know them more intimately North, Middle and South Sister. My earliest memories are of my families 50 miler backpacking trips in the Three Sisters Wilderness. More than 260 miles of trails cross the Wilderness, including 40 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail. The PCT travels along side The Sisters on it's way to the Jefferson Wilderness area.

So in honor of the Three Sister Wilderness we are adding to our menu a breakfast scramble- Three Sisters Scramble. Eggs, sausage, potato, diced tomato and cheese with spices. We suggest bringing along your favorite salsa packet and some corn or flour tortillas. Making it a wonderful breakfast, fueling you for your adventures of the day ahead.  

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 What do you do with freeze dried tomatoes, eggs and sausage? Add water and scramble to make a wonderful breakfast for the most ravenous of hikers...my 8 year old nephew. Now if Greg likes a meal you know you have a winner and when he asks for seconds it confirmed that I had a new meal.The day was spent backpacking uphill along the Herman Creek trail in the Gorge. We had planned to hike through Jefferson Park in central Oregon but snow in July changed our plans. I am not talking about a patch of snow here and there, that we could of managed. But the snow pack at 5000 ft was still a solid four feet thick and every where. With a change of plans we found our selves in the forest of the Gorge hiking amongst the forest with gifts of waterfalls and trillium. At camp for dinner Greg cooked up some beef stroganoff with gusto. He is a professional noodle taster and after half a dozen Country Pasta noodles tasted/tested we were served a wonderful, tasty bowl of stroganoff. 

And for dessert my niece Allison got creative with chocolate graham crackers and instant vanilla pudding. A trick I learned a long time ago and one that she mastered this summer. A package of vanilla pudding and dry instant milk added together in a zip lock. At camp add water and spend the next ten minutes mixing, squishing and tossing the zip lock (praying it stays sealed) around to mix the pudding. As it sets grab the bag of graham crackers and smash into tiny bits. Pour a layer of crackers into your bowl, cut a corner off the pudding bag and squeeze some pudding onto the crackers. Dig in.


It has been fun to see my niece and nephew backpacking and to hear them talk along the trail. On the way out back to the car, Allison was hot on my heals. I turned around to see how she was doing and she had stopped. She was looking out into the forest across the valley we had just hiked. She said that she thought " Only a hundred or so people have seen all these trees" I confirmed her thought and told her that I thought what we were looking at was how Lewis and Clark saw it over 200 years ago and how I hoped she would become a steward of these forests so that the next 100 people could enjoy it.

Happy Trails

 Embark is an adventure travel company that offers once-in-a-lifetime adventures for clients who want to explore the most remote corners of the planet. Tour the world's great frontiers, summit some of its highest peaks, climb Mt. Kilimanjaro, embark on a Tanzania safari, trek through the villages of Nepal or Bhutan, and interact with locals on a level most tourists only dream of.

Posted on their blog May 2, 2011

"We at Embark always love to see and cheer on other Portlanders working on projects in the outdoors. The latest to come across our radar is a great little outfit run by three women out of NE Portland called Hungry Hikers. Their tagline says it all: “We fuel your adventure.” From classics like Beef Stroganoff (pictured) and Sheppard’s Pie to the more unique Forest Park Pilaf and Cascade Corn Chowder, this lineup is looking stellar. Check out their full line of yumminess via their online store, where one meal costs $8.99."

 

Check them out you might just find the adventure of a lifetime. www.embarkadventures.com